Psychopomp and Circumstance

PSYCHOPOMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE

by Adrean Messmer (Softcover)
Genre: Horror/Urban Legend
ISBN: 9780692673355
Page Count: 191
It starts on Facebook with an update Nell doesn’t remember making. It’s bad enough she’s dying and none of her friends know, now she’s pretty sure she’s going crazy. It seems the bright,safe little town of Brandon is descending into darkness, dragging the inhabitants along for the ride.

Catalog Code: AMSP0006

Psychopomp and Circumstance on A Murder of Storytellers
Psychopomp and Circumstance on Amazon

SMELLS LIKE TEEN SEWERCIDE: A REVIEW OF PSYCHOPOMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE BY ADREAN MESSMER by Jonathan R.
Adrean Messmer’s first novel is a complex and varied story about the interconnected social dynamics of one group of post-high school late-teens-early-twenty-somethings and the malevolent force that stalks them. It feels, in spirit, very much like a late 90s/early 00s novelization of a teen-focused horror film a la Scream, I Know What You Did Last Summer, or Phantoms. Coming from me that is, of course, a compliment.

Review: ‘Psychopomp & Circumstance (Books of Nethermore #1)’ by Adrean Messmer by Josh Black
“More than an impressive debut, this is just a damn good novel. If you’re into teen slashers and want something with a little more substance than the typical fare, if you miss hanging with Buffy and the gang in Sunnydale, if you’ve ever wanted a story where Freddy comes to Fear Street, and you want all of this with a thoroughly contemporary edge, you’re going to love Psychopomp & Circumstance.”

REVIEW: PSYCHOPOMP & CIRCUMSTANCE BY ADREAN MESSMER by GingerNuts of Horror
“Told in chapters, each from a different characters point of view, Messmer creates a town where the boundaries have been torn down. Where the dead walk and are not happy to just whisper and slam doors.  She delivers a Clive Barkeresque “Candyman” quality of nightmare as character and anguish as script that translates into a reading experience that is not that common.  A fun read but an unsettling one.  There is a lot on display here: remorse, jealousy, sadness, loss and guilt and wrapped around the suburban ghost story.”

Wizard World Tulsa – 2016

Come check out several IPHI authors as they present panels at this year’s Wizard World Comic Con in Tulsa!

Friday, October 21st
5:30-6:15PM

VILLAINS VERSUS VILLAINS (CONFERENCE HALL B)
A battle royale between villains! What makes a great monster or just plain psycho-antagonist? Creators divulge which characters claim the best villain award. Why do some win our hearts while others creep us out? Genese Davis (The Holder’s Dominion), Jack Burgos (Dark and Dangerous Things) Shannon A. Thompson (Bad Bloods), and RA Jones (Writer – Wolverine; Captain America) will share their perspectives and creative process including what key ingredients they focus on when creating vicious characters. Don’t miss this thrilling discussion.

Saturday, October 22nd
1:30-2:15PM

(STILL) CHASING WHIMSY: THE JOURNEY CONTINUES! (CONFERENCE HALL B)
Congratulations! You’ve written and published your first novel!
Sooo… now what? Join A. W. Selby, author of THE ASTONISHING BOBCAT: HERO WORSHIP and the creative team at Ursa Minor Fiction, for a discussion about the process of writing and publishing the next book in a series, sustaining creative momentum, as well as an exclusive preview reading from Selby’s upcoming novel, THE ASTONISHING BOBCAT TAKES MANHATTAN.

Sunday, October 23rd
11:00–11:45AM

LIVING IN THE MARGINS (CONFERENCE HALL A)
This panel will include three to four people who fall in a ‘marginalized’ category. Discussion will center around current and past representation of people of color, women, handicapped, and LGTBQ people among others in popular media. Emphasis on the importance of representation, on media that’s doing it well and places where we could still improve. With panelists: Donna A. Leahey, Adrean Messmer, Jack Burgos, Shannon Iwanski, Kenzi Whala

Sunday, October 23rd
12:00-12:45PM

DOES GENDER MATTER? (CONFERENCE HALL A)
From how a movie reboot should cast its characters to how a comic should draw its female superheroes, questions of gender remain a powerful issue in the world of sci-fi, fantasy, horror, gaming, films, and more. How can we as creators and as fans help to break past these issues to build a more inclusive, less stereotyped fandom? In this panel of local authors, comic book experts, and all-around SFF-loving fans, we’ll discuss what’s working, what isn’t, and where we can go from here. Adrean Messmer to speak.

Ride the Train by Shannon Iwanski

ride-the-trainRIDE THE TRAIN

by Shannon Iwanski (as Shannon Bozarth) (Softcover)
Genre: Dystopian/Post‐Apocalyptic
ISBN: 9780615969312
Page Count: 244
In the irradiated ruins of the United States, the populace is subjected to tests for “the disease.” Anyone found to be infected are sent to camps for wholesale slaughter. When Carla’s son is diagnosed, they will do anything to survive. That’s when Alex arrives, just in time to offer the family a chance to flee their oppressive regime via the train.

Catalog Code: SHIW0001

Ride the Train on Amazon

(5 Star) This is not an easy book, if you are a marginalized person you will see yourself in the characters time and again. It will hurt, and it will do so much more. It will open you up, it will give you hope, and it will change you. I rode the train, and you should too.

(5 Star) The goal of speculative fiction is to magnify an issue the author sees in the modern world, and extrapolate it, to show the eventual extreme that such a path might take. Ride the Train seeks the conclusion to such issues as LGBT issues, the presence of religion in politics, and the rights of individuals to live freely. It does so magnificently. A story told in three parts, with a different narrator for each, it exposes cruelties that can be found even in today’s world, horrible atrocities that should give anyone pause. Another author may have put such events into their story for mere shock value, scenes to show that the villains were depraved in their evil. But in Ride the Train, they are tinged with a realness, a melancholy reminiscent of real tragedy that have effects on the characters and the world. It is not a happy look at what our world may be, but it is a compelling one. One that I will likely find myself revisiting again.

Read Excerpt Below

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